Lee Scott – Butter Fly (Review)

Dirty Dike, Lee Scott, Reviews

High Focus Records continue their genre dominance with this, their latest release coming from Lee Scott who has built a formidable reputation with a career filled with classics in his signature, unique vibe. ‘Butter Fly’ is produced in its entirety by HF’s own Dirty Dike, and is the first whole project the SMB representative has made the beats for. Dike’s jazzy instrumentals and Lee’s swaggering presence and witty lyricism combine to create one of the best UK hip hop albums I’ve heard for a while.

Lee Scott - Butter Fly (Album Cover)

The album gets underway with the title track, and the chilled, crisp instrumental with intermittent piano chords and a subtle, simplistic drum beat allows for Lee Scott to drop bars filled with nice internal rhymes and heavy multisyllabics. The pitched adlibs add to Lee’s swegged out atmosphere, and it’s an opener that is guaranteed to make you listen on. Following this comes the fantastic ‘Don’t Make Me’, which has been on repeat since the video was released online. The slow paced beat with an infectious walking bassline and Lee’s intricate writing style and uniquely hilarious punchlines, such as ‘I don’t give a fraction of an ounce of a fuck/It’s an accident I’m on this this planet like Howard the Duck’ make this one of the standouts.

The dusty ‘Walking The Walk’ is another excellent cut from ‘Butter Fly’. Lee’s leftfield imagery, relatable references and consistently confident delivery show that his pen game and microphone presence are second to none. He’s a giant in the game, and a self-proclaimed one at that if we are to believe that he’s really ‘playing human sized subbuteo’ as is said on the slightly trippy ‘Manatee Rap’. The scathing analysis of the lazy society we’re all a part of right now on ‘Watch TV’ is a dope concept track, and shows Lee’s versatility. Dike’s ear for smooth samples that gel perfectly with Scott’s style and flow is apparent throughout ‘Butter Fly’, making it an exceptionally cohesive listen.

‘Eight O’ Clock In The Morning’ is another dope track with subtle samples and hard hitting boom bap drums. Lee’s second verse on this track is incredibly well structured with a weird storytelling vibe, and it’s very well executed. Following this comes my personal favourite track from the album; ‘Sell Drugs’. This track embodies what makes Lee Scott one of the most listenable artists in the scene right now with witty concepts and heavy bars , and Dike’s pounding kicks and tight snares provide the perfect backdrop.

‘Butter Fly’ is an outstanding release from front to back. Lee Scott and Dirty Dike’s partnership works sublimely, with suitable beats and charismatic spitting throughout. This is pure butter; jazzy, fresh and undeniably individual. High Focus haven’t disappointed yet, and I can’t see them starting now.

By Sam Bennett

@TheRealPP

@TinFoilFronts

@DirtyDikeSMB

http://www.facebook.com/LYTEWORK

http://www.high-focus.com

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Lee Scott & Black Josh – B Movie Millionaires (Review)

Black Josh, Lee Scott, Reviews

Blah Records continue their steady output of swegged out, quality hip hop with a 5 track EP courtesy of Lee Scott and Black Josh. This combination of original Blah head and one of the label’s new generation has worked on previous collaborative tracks, and to hear Lee Scott’s unique perspective and wit and Black Josh’s precise, skippy flow and intricate lyricism is a real treat.

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Produced in its entirety by Baileys Brown, ‘B Move Millionaires’ features a section of hauntingly raw hip hop beats for Lee and Josh to spit over. The funky loop of ‘Chicken N Chips’ is a dope way to start the project, with Lee’s original punchlines and references catching the ear like pretty much any verse of his does. King Grubb joins on this opener, and each MC laces the track with memorable verses.  Pronouncing the ‘Blah syndicate clique, the best shit since chicken and chips’, their string of excellent releases seems to prove his point perfectly.

The gloomy, grimy instrumentals of ‘Happy Land’ and ‘Dollface’ take the EP into traditional territory for Blah heads. With weeded out, hedonistic lyricism and punchlines for days, the vibe is consistent and enjoyable; the kind of hip hop Blah Records specialises in is something remarkably different from  what is going on in the rest of the scene, and it’s perfectly exemplified here. ‘Skedaddle’ is another dope menacing cut, and ‘F.H.R.I.T.P.’ is a heavy closer, with King Grubb and Stinkin Slumrok making nice appearances.

‘B Movie Millionaires’ is an EP any hip hop head should check out. Lee Scott’s discography speaks for itself, and he’s still releasing quality music, with a lot in store for the future. His new album on High Focus, entirely produced by Dirty Dike will be an exciting prospect for sure. Black Josh is making a real impact and building buzz at a rapid pace, and it’s easy to see why. Baileys Brown handles the production expertly on this EP, and the lyrics are as on point as ever. This is a quality project from two of the UK’s best MC’s.

By Sam Bennett

@TheRealPP

@LYTEWORK

@TinFoilFronts

@BlackJoshAPE

http://www.facebook.com/LYTEWORK

http://www.blahrecords.com

Lee Scott, Trellion, Milkavelli & Sumgii – Cult Mountain (Review)

Lee Scott, Milkavelli, Reviews, Sumgii, Trellion

Blah Records godfather Lee Scott joins forces with Sheffield’s Trellion, of Bad Taste Records, Piff Gang’s Milkavelli and Sumgii, who is behind the swagged out, wavey beats heard on many PG and LDZ tunes, on this cult edition project, entitled ‘Cult Mountain’. Any longtime Blah head will know that Lee and Don Silk have worked together previously; both were members of the legendary Children of the Damned, back when Milkavelli was known as Monster Under The Bed, so to hear this reunion of two of the sharpest spitters this country has produced, with the addition of one of the most distinctive rappers coming out of the North and a truly exceptional producer is a real treat. 

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‘Cult Mountain’ starts off with ‘616’, and the spacious instrumental, bass heavy kick drum and swegged out lyrics (you know if you’re ’bout that life) combine to make an infectious piece of cocky, lazy hip hop. Milkavelli’s verse features a nice section where he reworks part of his verse from Piff Gang’s ‘Bionic’, and it works well in the new context; It’s clear from this opener that the three MC’s tones and styles of delivery are very well suited.

‘SMFDB’ instantly impressed when it was uploaded onto YouTube, and it’s a punchline heavy track, with Don Silk stating that ‘all these rappers getting sacked like they’re David Moyes’. Lee Scott is rated ‘on a scale of excellent to extraordinary’, and his stylistically unique and distinctive approach is emphatically effective, and his prolific output as of late is something to be respected.

The wonky instrumental of ‘Ay’ is a highlight; Sumgii’s style compliments the slow paced spitting perfectly, and Trellion’s menacing verse is heavy, as is Milkavelli’s cocky and technical multisyllabic ridden appearance. Trellion’s fellow Sheffield based, Bas Taste representative Sniff makes an impressive appearance on here, and if you’re not already aware of it, make sure to check their previous work together.

‘Cult Mountain’ is a dope little project. It’s on an ultra-exclusive steez, and I think the vinyl is sold out, so you better hurry to pre-order the tape versions. It’s packed with five cohesive and banging tracks, with three of the UK’s most talented MC’s coming together to produce a quality release. Get this while you still can.

By Sam Bennett

@TheRealPP

@LYTEWORK

@TinFoilFronts

@Trellion_Luna

@Milkavelli

@Sumgii

http://www.facebook.com/LYTEWORK

http://cultmountain616.bandcamp.com

Lee Scott – CactusOwlMoonGoat (Review)

Lee Scott, Reviews

Lee Scott needs no introduction. Blah Records have long been one of the most respected UK hip hop record labels, with a huge catalogue of classic releases, and Lee has been storming the scene as of late with some quality music. This is his latest project, entitled ‘CactusOwlMoonGoat’, and it’s packed with dusty jazz samples, hard hitting drums and the special breed of intricate lyricism only Lee Scott can deliver.

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Lee Scott begins this journey with ‘So Cactus So Owl’, which is produced by Dirty Dike and Molotov. The smokey brass samples back Lee as he spits with an engaging and hypnotising swagger. Lee drops some heavy quotable’s, including ‘If i was wack, wack’d be the new dope’, and the way he combines abstract imagery with a straight up British attitude makes for a really dope listen.

‘Craig Mack’ is an immense track, and Lee is joined on here by Black Josh. Name-checking various Bad Boy artists in various clever ways, Lee Scott absolutely kills the haunting instrumental, produced by Morriachi, asking ‘Who the fuck’s the Benjamin and why’s it all about him?’. Black Josh’s verse is tight and precise, he is definitely one to watch over the next year or so, with an instantly recognisable tone and flow.

The Blah Records head honcho proclaims ‘I only drink on days ending in Y’ on ‘Axl Rose’, and the slow moving instrumental is another atmospheric one, again produced by Morriachi. Following this track comes ‘Me O’Clock’, which is definitely one of the standouts. The silky piano samples, courtesy of Illinformed, back Lee as he spits about living on your own time, and this track has been on repeat since I first heard it.

Stinkin Slumrok puts in a savage performance on ‘Why Clef?’, with a consistent flow and gritty presence. Slumrok has some really dope tracks and video’s on YouTube, and he is definitely another one to watch. ‘Stanley’s Friends’ is another standout, with Lee being joined by Hibernation, who delivers a heavy verse, as well as a pitched up and down verse from WH@IB££, whose identity seems to be a mystery. The sheer weirdness of this track makes it an absolute banger.

Following this comes ‘Sink’, which is a far more chilled affair, again seeing Lee Scott drop the knowledge, spitting ‘with the IQ of Jesus, and a black belt in genius’. The fantastic references in the Blah head honcho’s lyrics always add so much to a track, and this is a case in point. The album closes with ‘Ellesse, Ellesse’, and Lee is joined here once again by Black Josh. Lee’s double time spitting impresses, proclaiming ‘I blow my own trumpet like Dizzy Gillespie’, and Black Josh’s charismatic appearance is also very effective.

‘CactusOwlMoonGoat’ is one of the most cohesive and impressive albums i’ve heard come out of the UK hip hop scene. Lee Scott’s ear for dark, atmospheric instrumentals, as well as his ability to also kill the more jazzy, sample heavy beats, sets him apart from his peers. There isn’t a weak track on here, and Blah Records is surely set to be one of the main players in the game for the foreseeable future.

By Sam Bennett

@TheRealPP

@LYTEWORK

@tinfoilfronts

http://www.facebook.com/LYTEWORK

http://www.blahrecords.com

Lee Scott – Tin Foil Fronts (Review)

Lee Scott, Reviews

Lee Scott is a founding member of legendary UK hip hop crew, Children of the Damned. Tin Foil Fronts is an album any fan of the scene has been eagerly awaiting. Lee has such a history of creating quality music, which always sounds so fresh amongst the other albums being released from his counterparts. 

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This is an album every UK hip hop fan has been looking forward to since rumours of its existence first started circulating. Lee Scott is such a prolific and forward thinking musician, it’s always very exciting to listen to a project from the Children of the Damned representative. Tin Foil Fronts is a dark exploration of Lee’s mind, with gritty hip hop beats and amazing verbal imagery making it impossible to switch off from this effortless display of how to rock a microphone and kill a beat.

Tracks like ‘GM Smooth’, which features lyrics such as ‘So here’s some random words to fill another bar’ as well as fantastically placed references and more abstract imagery and messages, are typical examples of Lee’s original style. It’s this command and exploitation of the English language that makes Lee Scott so well respected, and makes his music so unique and different. It’s great to hear Lee switch from gritty, boom bap tracks to songs such as ‘Yes He Did’. This features a more modern production style, and some weaving multi syllabics. With a flow that never strays off beat, it’s very pleasing to hear just how progressive this album is; this isn’t 16 tracks of the same dusty old 90s beat, this is simply some sick rap music.

‘Tunnel Deep’ has already been doing the rounds on YouTube, with a fantastic, vivid visual counterpart to the intense and mysterious track. Lee packs a punch with this track, and it still remains one of the standouts. However, the standout is ‘Puta’, it’s too good. Lee’s verse is fantastic, and it’s great to hear him team up with Don Silk, formerly known as Monster Under The Bed of COTD fame, and now rapping as part of Piff Gang, as well as two incredible spitters from Sheffield, Trellion & Sniff. This mean, slow paced hip hop is something Trelli & Sniff, as well as Lee himself specialise in, and this track is something else. The menacing beat, bars and flows represent underground hip hop at its core. Tin Foil Fronts is an album that anybody who prides themselves as a lyricist will appreciate from start to finish. Tracks like ‘Pie Eyed’ & ‘Goat Rap’ both see Lee Scott using some fantastic rhyme schemes, with so many internally connected syllables it makes it sound as if he’s simply gliding along the instrumentals. This album will hush anybody doubting Lee Scott’s ability as one of the best writers in UK hip hop.

Tin Foil Fronts is a fantastically crafted album, with a very unique sound and style throughout the entire LP. Lee Scott has always been a prolific rapper, with his back catalogue being packed full of gems and underground classics, and this album is yet another dope piece of work to add to that. Displaying incredible lyrical ability, as well as an expertly selected beat choice, this is a very dark hip hop album, but one that is sure to brighten the day of any fan of real lyricism.

By Sam Bennett

@TheRealPP

@TinFoilFronts

http://www.blahrecords.com